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20121224
20121224
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
of midway airport. another way for the city to lose money. the city just privatize the parking meters. $1.5 billion deal, 75 years, but the problem is this. they got all the money up front and the city spent all the money already, and now in the parking meters are out of order because they're tearing up the street they have to pay the company back. usually privatization does a better job of managing things like airports and the government tenders to do, but people in chicago are kind of wary about this. he wants to privatize midway airport. have a deal. ithey deal to do it for $2.5 billion. airports are huge generators of cash. the parking concessions, food and beverage concessions, rental car rentals, the places that do that tends to be a big cash generator. companies like to get in on that, i like to do it more efficiently. but here's the problem. don't get the money up front and spend it somewhere. say this time they will not do that, to be a revenue stream. instead of a revenue jumped to balance the budget. i guess we will see. ashley: just come it looks markedly orderly behind you gi
plans. good morning, welcome to "starting point." chilly in new york city. 7:00 in the morning. i'm alina cho in new york. >> and i'm dana bash in washington. monday, december 24th. christmas eve. "starting point" begins right now. >> and our "starting point," a u.s. contractor in kabul gunned down and killed this morning by a woman wearing an afghan police uniform. it happened inside kabul's police headquarters. the latest in a string of suspected green on blue attacks that are hitting morale and eroding trust in allies there. our pentagon correspond respondent barbara starr up early for us working her sources. joins us live from washington with more. >> good morning, alina. in the last few minutes, our nato sources are confirming privately that, indeed, it was an american citizen. a contractor shot and killed by a woman, an afghan woman in a police uniform inside kabul police headquarters. what is not known at this point or they are not saying, whether this woman was an afghan police officer or came into possession of the uniform, stole it. we have seen these kinds of incidents
said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times" saying no. saying pc sales are lower than expected. you've got microsoft down by about 1%. one of the leaders for the year, you mentioned bank of america, the best performing stock on the dow. a double this year if you're lucky enough to get in on bank of america and stick with that trade. across the board financials seeing a little bit of weakness in today's session. >> keep an eye on facebook. obviously the news a little thin this morning. the sunday "times" of london reporting the company has various methods of tax
a better job for less money. house said the -- city government left the park and dangerous mess and 12 private charity left it beautiful. also these ex-con max and they pick up the trash the government does not and after hurricane sandy there was a ton of cleanup. they helped out more than government. not only
inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" magazine. he recognized the city was changing and there was this new middle-class audience that did not have their own publication. he created the magazine. it was different from anything we have seen before. it was so different it sort of took your breath away. it was deeply impressive to me. he got wonderful writers. he was all for subjective takes on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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